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''Whats was Learnt from this First ever International Panorama?

 Now that The International Panorama is Finished. What Were Some of the Lessons learned to Progress Our Pan Culture?

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Some of the Things that I learned from the First IPC Competition  Is.  [1] No Foreign will ever Win a Panorama in Trinidad. [2] The Judging System is Still Flawed. [3] We are not so far Ahead of the World in Pan as We thought We Were.

I echo your sentiments, Valentine. The talk used to be "no fgn band could beat a local band", that myth has been dispelled.

When TASPO landed in ENGLAND in 1951 they impregnated that country with the PAN CULTURE. Today, a STEELBAND from ENGLAND could go to TRINIDAD and OUTPLAY ALL STARS AND PHASE II AND RENEGADES with BORROWED and UNFAMILIAR PAN CONFIGURATIONS -- on SHORT PRACTICE.

The CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM of STEELPAN is in ENGLAND and AMERICA right now.

VALENTINE YOUNG, I learned that it will be difficult to beat All Stars next year.

Patrick: I thought yuh was ah YOUNG FELLAH from your post. Next thing I know you talking about CHILDREN and GRAND CHILDREN.

Nah, old enough to produce winners in 'pan'.

we shall see- its getting  boring to hear a lot of the same from all stars every year

Not one damn thing was learnt!

I must commend Phase 11 And Renegades for playing ''new'' tunes., which tells me that the other BANDS had ample time to do something ''new''. I learnt that D Stewart is arranging for half of the participants hence making the foreign bands reliant on ''WE'' arrangers. [I was Impressed with BSO, though!]

I learnt that PAN has been accepted as a family of musical instruments by the world;

that foreign bands came seeking validation to the mecca of PAN and they got it,

that the world has by and large accepted that Trinbago is still  the mecca;

but we are fast losing our premier position as inventors, developers and master players to countries that are richer, with more resources and a far larger talent pool.

that we need urgently a strategic national plan to reestablish Trinbago's premier position in the PAN business.

I also know that we have the talent available to develop the strategies needed; and  that we could find the resources to allocate..

What I don't know is, if we have the political and national will to engage the full society in the exercise.

Energy is a finite resource and will run out one day. Creativity and talent however, increases exponentially in relation to the time and attention devoted to nurturing. 


I learnt that PAN has been accepted as a family of musical instruments by the world;that foreign bands came seeking validation to the mecca of PAN and they got it,
that the world has by and large accepted that Trinbago is still  the mecca;
but we are fast losing our premier position as inventors, developers and master players to countries that are richer, with more resources and a far larger talent pool.
that we need urgently a strategic national plan to reestablish Trinbago's premier position in the PAN business.
I also know that we have the talent available to develop the strategies needed; and  that we could find the resources to allocate..
What I don't know is, if we have the political and national will to engage the full society in the exercise.
Energy is a finite resource and will run out one day. Creativity and talent however, increases exponentially in relation to the time and attention devoted to nurturing. 

BRILLIANT RESPONSE, KEVIN!!!

The answer to your question is NO! We lack that political will because the approach is now a TOP DOWN approach to an invention that was created BOTTOM UP -- and I mean BOTTOM UP!

TOP DOWN negates the FULL SOCIETY!!!

Kelvin and Claude you have nailed the issue very succinctly and Claude has tied the bow on it.

When we begin to think outside of the box we realize that since Pan is a product of grassroots ingenuity and agreeably that a strategic plan is needed to find the resources,  we would have to  again take a similar approach to that of those who birthed it. Except this time in restoring it to the domain of the gentry that birthed it, we would have to guard against the chaos, bobol and general disgruntledness that has always accompanied pan affairs.

The business of pan does not belong in the hands of politicians, but in that of competent trustworthy  private individuals  who are accountable to a non-profit organisation vested in supporting pan artists, and  who understand that the promotion and development of the Pan, locally (in T&T) must be treated as a business. If this approach is taken seriously where  there is on-goiing training and development of these carefully selected officials ( in accounting, investing,marketing,fund raising, public relations, technology etc) there definitely will be hope for the future of the industry of pan in T&T.  

When I view the various pan orchestras they each appear to number in the hundreds. When these are multiplied by the scores of local steel bands, our pan artistes number in the thousands .This constituency of artistes is under appreciated, mistreated and I daresay exploited. They are not properly represented, they are systematically and brilliantly contributing to the continued growth of the instrument and now find themselves at the threshold of having to compete with outsiders who have greater resources , supportive governments and countries and encounter less obstacles, in pursuing their passion and purpose as musicians.

Pan artistes are in a category of music performance that exists nowhere else in the music world. Interest in the instrument is, as was mentioned , increasing exponentially in relation to the time and attention devoted to nurturing the  unique profession for the future growth, stability and sustainability. They stand on the shoulders of the 'pan giants '(who have gone before) and currently are the ones enthusiastically continuing the legacy, giving the instrument it's enormous respect  and recognition that it is receiving worldwide. Kudos to the sponsoring corporations who are doing their part in supporting these endeavours.

In Regard to judging, there has got to be first a shift in the mindset of the powers that be. The competition should be segmented to reward steel orchestras in each category of music selected. Despite the fact that the competition is entitled 'International', there should be a Caribbean or T&T segment of competing. (The idea is to eliminate the disgruntled factor, and edify our local pan artistes to the world).

There should also be a juried process of vetting and selecting the judges. Open and transparent to the public.

The  foreign judges can also be selected ( one per region) according to the region from where bands are competing, but leaving the majority of judges to hail from T&T, because they are arguably the experts.

After all " T&T is the 'mecca of pan'...Kelvin Scoon.

Now we come to funding. Massive fundraising launched  2- 5 years in advance and treated as if it is an olympic event, will create a buzz,locally and abroad, attract major sponsors, locally and abroad, attract angel investors , tourist traffic,and motivate the artistes and boost their esteem, since all this shows that they are appreciated and valued  the way rock stars are. Such an event should be advertised and heralded the way jazz, rock and film festivals are by the music aficionadoes across the globe. The tourist board has not yet adequately stepped up to recognise this event as an attraction to be sold to  pan and other music lovers worldwide. 

Of course the  fund-raisers/organisers have to be kept accountable with the funds with trustees, money-managers for growing the funds, a receivership or whatever is effective and transparent. We can learn something from the demise of FIFA officials. There is still Hope. They just need to Try a Ting, it might work.

I might be wrong, but this is my take on the whole thing from a distance.

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